The Unusual: The Best Quirky Things to Do in Chicago

If you have never gone to Chicago or visited the city in the winter season, then you haven’t seen the best of this city. In the summer season, the city truly unfolds its beauty and you have to be on time to enjoy the buzz around this city.

People of Chicago gather around the lakefront and the spot hums with live music, roadside celebrations, and outdoor dining. The regular tourist itinerary comprises stops at the Art Institute, a boat ride on the lake or the river, Navy Pier, the Magnificent Mile, Wrigley Field, and the Willis (Sears) Tower, among different spots. If you have as of now been to these places, or you would rather go further off the beaten track, here are the best quirky things to do in Chicago.

  1. Devon Avenue

Devon Avenue is reminiscent of the Indian subcontinent. Just go towards Devon Avenue close to Western and you will be in a spot where saris, turbans, and shalwar kameezes are the request of the day. This place is dubbed as an Indian neighborhood yet it’s both Indian and Pakistani. You will discover Gandhi Electronics right over the road from an Islamic Finance Bank and both Hindu and Muslim-appear to exist together here in a pleasant manner.

  1. Richard H. Dreihaus Museum

If you visit Chicago’s old Nickerson Mansion, you will be transported back to the Gilded Age. In case, you travel through the places, you will be left stunned by the fancy re-colored glass, the majority of the astounding period furniture, and the Moorish motivated stylistic theme. There is no better place to discover how the city’s upper-class people have inhabited at the turn of the 20th-Century.

  1. Arabic Taste in Albany Park

The Albany Park is a fascinating neighborhood. It contains some of the best Middle Eastern restaurants in the city. Just take the Brown Line train up to Kedzie to get a captivating feeling of this place. Walk between the Montrose and Lawrence and you will find Arab shops, bakeries, and restaurants. Here, there are lots of good restaurants such as Al Khyam (Lebanese), Salam (opening in-the-divider skillet Arab), and Noon O Kabab (Persian).

  1. The Money Museum at the Federal Reserve Bank

Within the Chicago’s Federal Reserve Bank, you will observe this intriguing little museum. In this museum, you can see and have your photo brought with old and uncommon coins and bills, including $5,000 and $10,000 bills. They also offer a free 45 moment guided tour visit at one p.m. (Monday-Friday) and on the way out you can select a pack of ‘Encouraged Shreds’ (worth $300 of destroyed, uncirculated cash).

  1. Neighborhood Beaches

Chicago beaches are usually filled with lots of people. But in the summertime, especially in the weekends, the Ohio Street and North Avenue beaches get incredibly crowded. As a result, you should head further north with a bike to find some space in the sand. If you are looking for a beach with sports and recreational activities, you should pay a visit to Foster Avenue Beach. Aside from it, if your interest lies in taking photos of the city skyline, you will be better of heading to the south of the city to Promontory Point in Hyde Park. To finish off, you can go to Pegasus in Greektown where you can enjoy a dinner or drinks on the rooftop decks.

In the end, I would suggest you finding your own way of doing things in an eccentric manner. These things will definitely make you happy, but you can do more as Chicago is a great city to do quirky things!

Polonia Festival: An Out-of-the-box Cultural Tradition in Chicago

Every country has all but one discerning point and that is the cultural difference. Different individuals characterize culture which is for the most part and ordinarily utilized as a part of today’s setting of understanding as the viewpoint or assessment of a whole society. This issue is reflected in their works, religions, words, books, values, convictions, cooking, music, garments, and many more. Besides, it is additionally the way individuals consider and comprehend the world and their own particular lives. In this way, every nation has distinctive cultural rituals and activities. Now, we will learn about a completely different culture that all Chicagoans celebrate in a particular style. So, let’s move forward and learn about Polonia Festival.

Every year, people of Chicago, especially the Polish-American individuals (known as the Taste of Polonia) celebrate a festival named – the Polonia Festival. It is held at the Copernicus Cultural and Civic Center in the Jefferson Park community place of Chicago in Cook Country, Illinois in each Labor Day weekend. From 1979, a four-day festive period of Polish cultural heritage, conventions and traditions are held highlighting the Taste of Polonia. This festival showcases delectable Polish cuisine, Polish handcrafters and artisans, and entertainment.

From the Northwest Side of Chicago, a lot of people come and participate in the celebration and the remaining people come from the other parts of Chicago and its distant areas. This festival draws the Chicago’s Polish community as well as even individuals of other ethnic groups. It draws around 30,000 people every year. As a result, a lot of politicians also visit this festival. In fact, politicians such as President George H. W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Tipper Gore have visited during their reigns. Along with the politicians, a lot of celebrities have paid a brief visit to this festival as well. So, it proves that it is a genuine festival where a lot of fun and food is involved.

Surprisingly, the biggest ethnically Polish population outside of the Polish capital of Warsaw is the Poles in Chicago. Therefore, it is one of the most vital Polonia centers as well. Consequently, the Chicago government has understood its importance. It has announced that it would be celebrated each Labor Day weekend at the Taste of Polonia Festival in Jefferson Park. The financial and social improvement of Chicago can be followed to the inclusion of the Polish individuals in Chicago as a result of their far-reaching vicinity amid the early participation in the history. In addition, there are numerous points of interest in Chicago which are developed with Polish architecture, design, and plan for example – the churches

A study on the historical background of Polish migrants in Chicago revealed that Polish migrants love to work where they live. They usually grow in the neighborhoods near factories, industrial areas, and transportation facilities. As a result, the major Polish immigrants live in the Northwest Side, specifically, around the three-way intersection point between Ashland Avenue, Division Street, and Milwaukee Avenue. Indeed, even with their development toward the northwest along Milwaukee Avenue, into Wicker Park, Bucktown, and Logan Square, the crossing point still turned into their political, monetary and social region. Along these lines, this was called as the Polish Triangle or the Polish Downtown in the first half of the twentieth century. But as of late, this name has been gradually eradicated as there are other numerous ethnic groups living in the region.

So, it is a satisfactory experience to observe different cultures and values of the other world, most notably the Polish culture. People who have attended the Polonia festival are totally satisfied and impressed. As a result, they go back and be a part of the festival every year.